#MURDOCKandMore

Congratulations, Follow-Up Raffle Winner Gloria Rucker!

Gloria Rucker of Concord fills out her Annual Follow-Up Form every year. This time, she won the $150 prize in a random drawing of those who had completed their forms.

“I was shocked,” she said. “People should fill out their form quickly, as soon as they get it. They might be a winner like me.”

Rucker battled multiple myeloma last year and survived thanks to a stem cell transplant in August 2016. She spent 15 days in the hospital and is now in remission.

She said she feels it’s important for MURDOCK Study participants who become sick to tell researchers by filling out their Annual Follow-Up Forms every year.

“I want to make sure that you continue to know about my health as it changes,” she said.

A longtime Cabarrus County teacher assistant and bus driver, Rucker retired in 2008 after working at W.R. Odell Elementary and Weddington Hills Elementary for 30 years. She enjoys serving her church, Rock Hill AME Zion, and has a son who is a student at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College.

For her prize, she chose a gift card to Olive Garden so she could share her good fortune with husband Larry Rucker, who is also enrolled in the MURDOCK Study.

COPD Study Enrollment Tops 100

More than 100 people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, have joined the new MURDOCK COPD Study, which will enroll 850 participants and follow the progression of the disease over five years.

The COPD study is a collaborative research effort between the MURDOCK Study and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) to better understand how COPD progresses within a community. This observational study could help researchers develop a better way for healthcare providers to assess COPD progression in their patients. It could also provide new insights into the correlation between lung function, exercise capacity, or COPD symptoms and disease progression. The principal investigator is Scott Palmer, M.D., director for DCRI Respiratory Research.

“This disease can have a profound impact on someone’s quality of life. As healthcare providers caring for patients with COPD, we want to help our patients understand their risk for flare-ups of breathing problems, hospitalizations, and other outcomes that can negatively affect their lives,” said Jamie Todd, M.D., co-principal investigator of the MURDOCK COPD Study. “Much of what we have learned about COPD to date has been gathered from research done in large academic medical centers. But for this study, we have the unique opportunity to work with the MURDOCK Study to better understand the progression and management of COPD in a community setting.”

Participants do not have to already be enrolled in the MURDOCK Study or live in a certain zip code to qualify. Eligibility includes:

  • At least 40 years old
  • Current or former heavy smokers
  • Not involved in an investigational drug study
  • Not listed for (or have not received) a lung transplant
  • Have COPD as determined by a breathing test administered during a screening visit

To learn more about enrolling in the MURDOCK COPD Study, call 704-250-5861 or email murdock-study@duke.edu.

Duke University Names New Director for MURDOCK Study

Welcome, Julie Eckstrand

Julie Eckstrand, R.Ph., has been named director of operations for the MURDOCK Study and Duke University’s other clinical research studies based at the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC).

A clinical pharmacist by training, Eckstrand will manage operations for the Translational Population Health Research Group, part of the new Duke Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI). The TransPop group’s research portfolio includes the MURDOCK Study and related projects involving biomarkers, longitudinal registries, and community-engaged research based at the Kannapolis office.

Eckstrand has offices in both Kannapolis and Durham and oversees a team of nearly 30 Duke employees.

“I am thrilled to return to my Duke family and begin new research endeavors with the NCRC community. We have important work to do that has the potential to be enormously impactful,” she said. “I am looking forward to meeting new collaborators and to a bright and productive future.”

Eckstrand has worked almost exclusively in human clinical research for 30 years. Most recently, she was executive director of the Nutrition Science Initiative, a nonprofit medical research organization dedicated to reducing the social and economic costs of obesity, diabetes, and other related and rare diseases by improving the quality of science in nutrition research.

Eckstrand returns to Duke after serving as assistant director for Clinical Support Services and Quality Management at the Duke Clinical Research Unit from 2011 to 2015. Prior to that, she worked as a clinical pharmacist in informatics specializing in enterprise analytics and patient safety research from 2006 to 2011.

A self-described “soccer mom, musician, and Sudoku fanatic,” Eckstrand is married and has two children in high school.

Enrollment continues rolling for COPD Study

Nearly 100 people have enrolled in the MURDOCK COPD Study, an observational study that is collecting information on the current level of symptoms, as well as ability to breathe, treatment, and outcomes of people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).
The study will enroll 850 people and follow the progression of the disease over five years. Participants are not required to already be enrolled in the MURDOCK Study or live in a certain zip code to qualify. To learn more, please click here.

MURDOCK Study now part of Duke CTSI

Duke’s Kannapolis office and the MURDOCK Study are proud to be part of the new Duke Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI), an academic hub for accelerating the translation and implementation of scientific discoveries into health benefits for patients and communities.
L. Kristin Newby, MD, MHS, principal investigator for the MURDOCK Study, is the faculty lead for the CTSI’s Translational Population Health Research Group. The CTSI strives to overcome the obstacles to developing discoveries into devices, drugs, or therapies to improve health. The CTSI collaborates with schools, departments, denters and programs across Duke. To learn more about the CTSI, click here.

Duke University names new director of operations for MURDOCK Study, related research projects

Julie Eckstrand, R.Ph., has been named the new director of operations for Duke University’s Translational Population Health Research Group, which includes the MURDOCK Study and Duke’s other clinical research studies based at the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) in Kannapolis.

In her new role, Eckstrand will manage operations for the “TransPop” Group for the new Duke Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).  The research portfolio includes the MURDOCK Study and related research projects involving biomarkers, longitudinal registries, risk modeling of data, and community-engaged research at the Duke-Kannapolis office. TransPop serves as an academic hub for accelerating the translation and implementation of scientific discoveries into health benefits for patients and communities. Continue reading Duke University names new director of operations for MURDOCK Study, related research projects

Thursday, March 16

Pancake Day at the Boys & Girls Club of Cabarrus County has been a tradition in Concord for sixty years!  Every year on  the third Thursday in March, dedicated board members, volunteers and staff spend the entire day cooking pancakes and sausage for thousands of hungry customers.  This is truly a community event, with close to 5,000 people attending each year. Click here for more info!

MURDOCK study and more

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