Help us improve the health of the community one person at a time.

  • enrollFollow-Up

    Don’t forget to complete your Annual Follow-Up Form when the MURDOCK Study contacts you every year around the anniversary of your enrollment.

  • community iconIn the Community

    The success of the MURDOCK Study correlates directly to the engagement of community partners and their willingness to actively support this long-term health study.

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  • partnerCollaborators

    CTSI TransPop offers collaborators a breadth of assets and capabilities developed since the inception of the original MURDOCK Study in 2007.

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  • Publications

    CTSI TransPop is committed to informing participants about all of the latest research findings from study investigators. Publications and abstracts are available here.

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EVENTS

  • DHMRI

    dhm

    The MURDOCK Study partners with the David H. Murdock Research Institute to access world-class technologies and platforms. Click on the logo above to see what other projects the DHMRI is supporting.

  • The Campus

    ncresearchThe North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis is a 350-acre research center located just north of Charlotte, NC. Corporations, universities and healthcare organizations

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  • Duke CTSI

     

    duke ctsi logoThe CTSI’s Translational Population Health Research team in Kannapolis manages many studies, including the MURDOCK Study, the COPD study, and the MS study.

UPDATES

  • MURDOCK MS Study Publishes Research Findings

    Physicians have long used beta interferon drugs to treat multiple sclerosis (MS), but these drugs only help about half
of patients. Now, samples and data from the MURDOCK
MS Study are helping researchers to better understand the difference between those who respond to beta-interferon treatment and those who do not. That could lead to alternative treatment options for people living with MS.
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  • New Gene Interaction Appears to be Associated with Increased MS Risk

    A person carrying variants of two particular genes could be almost three times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis, according to the latest findings from scientists at Duke Health and the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

     

    The research used biological samples from the MURDOCK MS Study. The finding, published in the March 23 issue of the journal Cell, could open the way for new tests to identify people who are at greatest risk of MS and autoimmune disorders, as well as the development of novel drugs, the researchers said.
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